Feeds:
Posts
Comments

What? That sounds insane, but remember there is a load of crazy stuff in science that we can learn and enjoy from. I do not mean burning your money is fun, neither I would give in to the challenge if I am not confident I could actually have it back in exactly the same condition as it should be. You can practice this using ordinary white paper or filter paper cut into note-like sizes, that is to build up your confidence that it truly works. So, have fun and burn your money away. Continue Reading »

HYDROGEN BALLOON

Let us get some basic stuff together and make a hydrogen balloon to demonstrate in the class. The main idea is to collect hydrogen gas from an acid-metal reaction and show the students the safest way to do it.

Continue Reading »

Many practical classroom activities could be carried out, when teaching the concepts of conduction, convection, and radiation. These are simple yet relevant, and would allow students to understand the topic easily. The concept has to be taught in the first 15 minutes of the 1-hour class and then proceed to show some of these demos.

The teacher prepares the materials needed and see to it that safety precautions are observed.

CONDUCTION ACTIVITY

  1. Prepare three different rods such copper, glass, and iron (or whatever is readily available, except of course plastic rods).
  2. Place them on a tripod and fix a small nail near one end of each rod using candle wax or Vaseline as ‘glue’. (Make sure the rods are not touching each other).
  3. Using a bunsen burner, heat the other ends of the rods evenly.
  4. Record the time it takes for each nail to drop off from the respective rods? Continue Reading »

CHEAPER LAVA LAMP

As much as possible, science teachers would want to do activities in the class, which are exciting but less expensive. Especially when the kids are asked to bring the materials needed and turned out to be difficult to find or too much for the wallet, the thrill to do it would eventually fade.

sample of a commercial Lava lamp (photo from yahoo images)

There are many lava lamps available in the market but why not make your own and use of materials that one can easily grab in the cupboard or take out from the medicine drawer or buy from the nearest supermarket. Today I am sharing to you how to make a LAVA LAMP which I have done myself several times in science club activities or classroom demonstrations. Continue Reading »

One of the most challenging tasks of a science teacher in a chemistry class is how to show that gases exist and it can be collected from simple reactions. Most common amongst these gases are OXYGEN, HYDROGEN, and CARBON DIOXIDE.

Yet there is a simple activity that could be done as a demo or class experiment to confirm those scientific explanation about acid-metal reaction.  Be sure the materials are readily available in your laboratory. There are other processes to produce these gases but these are the ones helpful and practical in a school setting. Continue Reading »

 

There is a very practical and simple way to make and test electromagnets in science laboratory. After you are done discussing the theory of electromagnets, it is time to allow students some hands-on activities, to thoughtfully remember the concept. This is not a grand experiment though, but at least your high school students could look into how and what are the necessary materials needed to make a simple electromagnet, and test its strength afterwards. Continue Reading »

RISE AND FALL OF STARS

Physics is so dear to me, although many students and science teachers alike do not feel good with it. To some, it is boring and full of Maths. Others just do not find it attractive to their intellect, I should say.  But to me, it is full of wonders and an endless chain of discoveries. One of my favourite topics in this field is Space and the Universe.  It appeals to me differently because I feel like watching a movie and doing some reflection at the same time.

Just like the stars that we glimpse in the sky on quite nights, they are full of excitement. They are part of the history that unfolds before our senses, because the stars that you see were actually there many years ago. Stars are light years away from the Earth, and so it would take years for its emitted light to reach us. A light year is a distance that light can travel in one year.  If a ray of light travels in a vacuum in approximately 3×108 m/s, the ray of the sun which distance from the Earth is approximately 150 million kilometres could reach the Earth in eight minutes, how much more for distant stars? Continue Reading »